Kriti Festival of South Asian and Diaspora Arts and Literature

Swati Khurana will be at the Kriti Festival of South Asian and Diaspora Arts and Literature at University of Illinois, Chicago, from September 25 – 28, 2014.

On Friday September 26, she will be giving a reading, and participating on panesl about MFA / Ph.D. Programs in Writing and Writing and Interdisciplinary Artistic Practice. Throughout the festival, she will be doing her “Texting Scrolls” project where she transcribes strangers’ text messages onto scrolls.

For festival information and schedule: http://desilit.org/kriti/

Lust, With Some Caution! An Evening of Erotic Readings

At three different interludes, one will eavesdrop on a mixture of messages that Swati Khurana has received and transcribed from five years of dating, along with those she has collected from her ongoing Texting Scrolls project—where strangers and friends, including SAWCC members, have shared their intimate text messages.

Lust, With Some Caution!

An Evening of Erotic Readings

Wednesday, July 30, 7pm

@ Sunita Bar

106 Norfolk Street (between Rivington and Delancey Streets)

New York, NY 10002

Join SAWCC at the Sunita Bar for a euphoric evening of readings by Shahana Hanif, Swati Khurana, Sunita Mukhi, Suniya Qureshi, Nitika Raj, Krupa Shandilya, Radhika Singh, Suleika Snyder, Anisha Sridhar, and Hamna Zubair. This program is funded by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Manhattan Community Arts Fund.

http://www.sawcc.org/lust-with-some-caution-selected-works/

“Sublime Scrolls” at Brooklyn Museum First Saturday

Come to get a text message immortalized by Swati Khurana as part of a performance art series curated by SAWCC

  • March 1, 2014
  • Target First Saturdays at Brooklyn Museum
  • SUBLIME performances are from 8 – 10 PM in the Beaux-Arts Court
  • For this program the museum is free and open to the public from 5 – 11 PM
Experience the sublime in its beauty and terror in this engaging and interactive performance art series presented by SAWCC (South Asian Women’s Creative Collective). You can unravel tales inscribed on a 216 foot long sari; seal your fate or fortune by sparring with the Gods, Karma, and Lady Luck; and even get bullied by Lady Liberty. Ordinary text messages and architecture that is worn on the body will also transport you to realms of precious wonder, delight, and pathos.

Curated by Shelly Bahl, Sunita S. Mukhi and Jasmine Wahi.

Performances by Monica Jahan Bose, Ruby Chishti, Anjali Deshmukh, Swati Khurana, Sunita S. Mukhi and Roshani Thakore.

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/visit/first_saturdays.php

Suzanne Lacy’s Between the Door and the Street, presented by Brooklyn Museum & Creative Time

Saturday October 19, 4:30-6:30pm, Swati Khurana will participate in Suzanne Lacy’s Brooklyn Museum & Creative Time project “Between the Door and the Street” featuring over 300 activists and artists.

From the curatorial statement: “Between the Door and the Street takes place in Brooklyn, where hundreds of women (and a sprinkling of men) will gather on beautiful brownstone stoops and in entry courtyards of Park Place, in the Prospect Heights neighborhood, for conversations about some of the critical issues confronting women today. The audience will act as a listening voyeur, piecing together the strands of a complicated narrative coming from this intergenerational group, which includes young girls, gay and straight men, activists, heads of feminist journals, preachers, and many others in a vast cross section of contemporary life. While the conversations will be about women, perhaps even feminism (though that term is controversial), some of the topics that will be discussed, like immigration, labor, and poverty, may not typically be viewed as ‘women’s issues.’ They nonetheless have very powerful and specific impacts on women’s lives.”

About the Project

The Full Participant List

Between the Door and the Street

Between the Door and the Street

SAWCC presents “Sublime”

Come to get a text message immortalized by Swati Khurana at DUMBO Arts Festival, as SAWCC presents “Sublime” featuring projects by Monica Jahan Bose, Ruby Chishti, Anjali Deshmukh, Sunita S. Mukhi, Roshani Thakore and Project For Empty Space.

“On Saturday, September 28th from 12-6pm Swati will present her Scrolling Texts project. With a red cigarette girl style tray, she will walk around and elevate passersby’s SMS messages from the banal to the sublime. By transcribing the text onto vellum and tying the scroll with a sacred red thread, an ephemeral message is transformed into a precious object.”

Directions and hours are availabe at the Dumbo Arts Festival website. Please go to SAWCC for more information on the exhibition and the mission of SAWCC.

Freedom, Safety, Now!

Swati Khurana started her yearlong residency at the Center for Book Arts in January. In her Letterpress class, she printed a series of posters with hand-set woodtype for a protest held by SAWCC.

Freedom, Safety, Now!

Freedom, Safety, Now!

On Saturday, January 26, 2013, the women of SAWCC (South Asian Women’s Creative Collective) organized a protest action in front of the New York City Indian consulate on Indian Republic Day, as a “response to the horrific violence wrought upon Jyoti Singh Pandey in India, and on women’s bodies everyday around the world.” Eighty people arrived in the below freezing temperatures, greeted by the sounds of the dhol (Punjabi drum), signs and chanting of “Freedom, Safety, Now!”

Please take a look at the following article written by Swati Khurana for The Harlem Times: http://theharlemtimes.com/politics/artists-collective-responds-to-gender-based-violence

Freedom, Safety, Now! Freedom, Safety, Now! 3

Freedom, Safety, Now! 4 Freedom, Safety, Now! 5

images courtesy of Jaishri Abichandani

Bronx Museum Holiday Party

Swati presents ‘Texting Scrolls, Scrolling Texts’ at the Bronx Museum of Arts annual holiday party and Coquito Masters Finals!

Come one come all to a tasty and festive event!

This Friday, December 14, 2012

1040 Grand Concourse at 156th Street

Event from 6-8 PM. “Texting Scrolls” from 7-8 PM.

FREE and Open to the Public

At the event, BRIO 2012 Awardee Swati Khurana presents “Scrolling Texts,” a participatory project in which attendees can have their saved text messages transcribed onto scrolls, tied with thread. Her project will be presented as part of Bronx Council of the Arts’ Artists for Community Enrichment (ACE) Program.

Songs to Live For

TRIBECA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER presents PARIJAT DESAI DANCE COMPANY in Songs to Live For

Saturday, June 5, 2010, 8p

Sunday, June 6, 2010, 3p/7p

$10

Parijat Desai, Aditi Dhruv, Kiley Durst, Belinda He, Mohan Kulasingam, Cori Marquis, Riyo Mito

Visuals Projection designed by Swati Khurana and Neeraj Churi

As part of their residency at Tribeca Performing Arts Center, Parijat Desai Dance Company will perform in the venue’s Theater 2 this June. PDDC will present two new works in development at TPAC, Songs To Live For and Make Space. Songs To Live For, a dance theater work based on Hindustani vocal music, explores the profound longing evoked by this thumri and khayal in particular. Responding to the quality of the music’s spacious vocals and rhythmic punctuations.” Desai draws on released movement from postmodern dance, and weaves in classical gesture in new ways.Desai uses thumri as a vehicle to investigate gender and desire. Hindustani music is rich with romantic poetry written by various poets: Sufis, Hindu bhakts, Sikhs, men, and women and sometimes expresses queer desire. As the work develops, Desai will also look at the music’s potent history: patronage by the Mughals rulers of both Muslim and Hindu artists.

Set to electronic music by South Asian American artists, Make Space rewires the sculptural positions of bharata natyam using postmodern/modern dance techniques, and remixes classical footwork patterns in response to contemporary beats. Dancers undulate and slide their bodies, creating openings within rigid classical forms. Desai also experiments with spatial relationships between bodies, traveling those new forms out into space, into the floor, into the air.

Songs To Live For is made possible in part with public funds from the Fund for Creative Communities, supported by the New York State Council on the Arts and administered by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.